Wednesday, August 17, 2005

ufsdump/ufsrestore file system

ufsdump/ufsrestore file system

> The root disk has some bad sectors. I am wondering if using
> ufsdump/ufsrestore to dump the file systems on root disk to another
> disk, will the data on the bad sector be lose? (As when dumping the
> file system, there are messages saying "cannot read block XXXXXX" ).

> Any better way to perform in this situation?

I recently faced the same situation. I wound up using the repair facility
in the format(1M) command. It took an excruciatingly painful amount of time
to actually determine WHICH blocks were faulty, but I wound up making it
work. All work was done on a 40MHz IPX Station under Solaris 7.

One thing I noticed, and it may be isolated to the Seagate drive I was
using, is that the repairs did not survive a reboot. Had me WTF'ing all
night.

I was still able to boot off the bad drive, it just ran into major issues
after booting. So I booted into single-user mode, looking something like
this:

Installed the new drive to device 0 (the boot device is 3.) Formatted,
partitioned, and newfs's the drive. Ran "format" and repaired the bad
sectors on the boot device. Then, performed a command like this:

cd /newdriveroot; ufsdump 0f - / | ufsrestore rf -

Once done (with all filesystems, in my case) I moved the new drive to device
3, and removed the old, bad drive.

Now, I did not have a working CD drive from which to boot, so I can only
assume that booting from CD and doing the work might have saved me hassle.
All-in-all, everything came over smoothly.

As an aside, I had to use a 68-pin drive to replace the old 50-pin drive.
Anyone familiar with the IPX Stations will tell you there is absolutely NO
room for any kind of drive adapter on the back of the drive. So, I
improvised. I used a 50F-68F adapter right in the on-board 50-pin SCSI
port, then used a 68-pin cable to the drive. I can't imagine I'm the first
to do this, but I haven't seen any mention of anyone else. Works like a
bloody charm, and breathed some extra life into my little server :)

--
Alan W. Rateliff, II

Reply


Michael Tosch Aug 12, 7:22 pm show options

>>The root disk has some bad sectors. I am wondering if using
>>ufsdump/ufsrestore to dump the file systems on root disk to another
>>disk, will the data on the bad sector be lose? (As when dumping the
>>file system, there are messages saying "cannot read block XXXXXX" ).

>>Any better way to perform in this situation?

> I recently faced the same situation. I wound up using the repair facility
> in the format(1M) command. It took an excruciatingly painful amount of time
> to actually determine WHICH blocks were faulty, but I wound up making it
> work. All work was done on a 40MHz IPX Station under Solaris 7.

I suggest
format> analyze
and perform a read test.
The default setting is to repair any bad sectors.

- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -

> One thing I noticed, and it may be isolated to the Seagate drive I was
> using, is that the repairs did not survive a reboot. Had me WTF'ing all
> night.

> I was still able to boot off the bad drive, it just ran into major issues
> after booting. So I booted into single-user mode, looking something like
> this:

> Installed the new drive to device 0 (the boot device is 3.) Formatted,
> partitioned, and newfs's the drive. Ran "format" and repaired the bad
> sectors on the boot device. Then, performed a command like this:

> cd /newdriveroot; ufsdump 0f - / | ufsrestore rf -

> Once done (with all filesystems, in my case) I moved the new drive to device
> 3, and removed the old, bad drive.

You certainly have made the new disk boot-able:

man installboot

> Now, I did not have a working CD drive from which to boot, so I can only
> assume that booting from CD and doing the work might have saved me hassle.
> All-in-all, everything came over smoothly.

> As an aside, I had to use a 68-pin drive to replace the old 50-pin drive.
> Anyone familiar with the IPX Stations will tell you there is absolutely NO
> room for any kind of drive adapter on the back of the drive. So, I
> improvised. I used a 50F-68F adapter right in the on-board 50-pin SCSI
> port, then used a 68-pin cable to the drive. I can't imagine I'm the first
> to do this, but I haven't seen any mention of anyone else. Works like a
> bloody charm, and breathed some extra life into my little server :)

What an old iron! It's more than 10 years ago that I maintained IPC and IPX
stations, but still have some of these tiny onboard-fuses in my drawer.

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