Friday, October 14, 2005

Veritas Volume Manager ! Changing Hostname

Veritas Volume Manager !

What are the effects of a *hostname change* on a server
which has all of it's drives including root/swap
encapsulated by Veritas Volume Manager ??

I have had a worst experience with LSM ( Digital version of
Veritas Volume Manager ) very recently.

Gopala,

Veritas VM assigns ownership to objects based on hostname, if you change
the hostname, the system will no longer own the objects.

Ron

> Ron

If you forget to export the volume group, you can manually change
the volume group ownership to allow it to be reimported.

> > Any discussion on this will be highly appreciated.

It's not clear what the problem that you ran into was. Encapsulated
volume groups aren't the cleanest part of Veritas volume manager.
Worst case, don't start the volume manager, manually delete anything
you can find of the encapsulated root volume group, restart the volume
manager and re-encapsulate the root volume group. Can't give you
specifics since I don't have a volume manager running currently.

If you had a stand alone boot disk w/ a copy of the volume manager on
it, you could use it to change host ownership.

If it turns out that Veritas can't handle hostname changes, you could
have always delete the root volume group before hand. Deleting volume
manager entities doesn't delete the actual data.

Offhand, based on what you haven't told us, that's all I can think
of.

I have changed the host name of a machine running VM 2.6 (under Solaris 2.6)
and nothing happens except that some processes are running with the old name,
but all works fine.

Check out man vxdctl

The commannd is vxdctl init newname

vxdctl init new_name

To confirm the change (and you may want to save the file before the
change, just in case ...), look in /etc/vx/volboot
(This is the name veritas is going to use during imports).

Good Luck.

Jeff Robinson / HDG

I
> encapsulated by Veritas Volume Manager ??

None at all. VxVM doesn't care a whit what the hostname is.
Now, if your hostid changes, you'll have licensing issues and
diskgroup attachment issues, but that's not what you asked.


K
[Doug Hughes]

> None at all. VxVM doesn't care a whit what the hostname is.

Oh, if only that was true. VxVM didn't find the A1000 until we
changed the hostname into non-FQDN. Now, why it cares is a mystery.
I wouldn't take any chances with that software...

> diskgroup attachment issues, but that's not what you asked.

Changing the hostname will not affect the volumes you've previously
installed unless you
issue a vxdctl init command which will change the output of vxdctl
list (hostid in there) this will cause VxVM to
think the disks are
owned by someone else.

<br>Now, if your hostid changes, you'll have licensing issues and
<br>diskgroup attachment issues, but that's not what you asked.</blockquote>

<p><br>Changing the hostname will not affect the volumes you've previously
installed unless you
<br>issue a vxdctl init command which will change the output of vxdctl
list (hostid in there) this will cause VxVM to think the disks are
<br>owned by someone else.
<
> I wouldn't take any chances with that software...

That is a problem with rm6, the software that manages the A1000, not
with VxVM.

I believe that the latest rm6 fixes this, not 100% sure though.
--

Actually what is happening is:
As I said it is called LSM ( logical storage Manager,
digital VxVM )
I start the server in single user mode, then I can see the
contents of the /etc/vol/tempdb directory ( which contains
all the disk groups listed ). Once I start the Veritas
services it locks out this directory. And every service
depends on the contents of this directory. Thus all
Diskgroups disappear from the picture, including vold ( on
Sun VXLD )daemon which is needed by all services and tools
on veritas.
My question is: Did it ever happen to anyone, wherein some
directories/file systems, encapsulated by VxVM, are not
accessible in *run level 3* and are accessible in *run
level 1* or when mounted as ReadOnly ??

I

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